Fungal Biology

Fungi range from microscopic, single-celled yeasts to vast underground mycelial colonies covering hundreds of acres. Because they are more closely related to animals than to plants and because their biology and genetics are easily manipulated, fungi are great model organisms.

Personnel

Research in Dr. Bar-Peled’s group aims to understand, at the molecular level, the roles of complex glycans in living organisms. We are interested in the roles of cell surface glycans (“sugar coated polymers”) in cell-cell recognition, pathogenicity, and communication between micro-organisms and their plant or animal hosts. In addition, we are…

"Genomes only make sense in the light of evolution, so for our research we use a combined evolutionary and bioinformatics approach to address questions at the intersection of genetics and microbial ecology. By studying the genomes of yeast we develop methods that can be used to analyse more complicated genomes and address questions about…

Fungi are major pathogens of plants. We are interested in understanding how fungi manipulate plant cells to cause disease and how plant cells respond to the invading fungi. To answer these questions, we study rice blast disease caused by the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae. Rice blast remains one of the world's most devastating diseases,…

Chromatin structure and function; Epigenetics; Eukaryotic genome stability; Histone H1

We are interested in understanding epigenetic and chromatin-based mechanisms that contribute to eukaryotic genome function, genome organization, and genome stability. In the nucleus, chromosomal DNA is packaged with histone and non-histone proteins…

The septin cytoskeleton in Aspergillus nidulans. Septins are less familiar and less well-understood than actin and tubulins because they were discovered more recently. But, it has become very clear in the last 5 years that septins play roles as diverse and important as those of actin and tubulin.  My lab is investigating the cell biology,…